Proleung Khmer

Saturday, February 12, 2005

New Books

Title: Reconciliation in Cambodia (274 pages)

Author: Suzannah Linton

Publisher: Documentation Series No. 5, Documentation Center of Cambodia,
P.O. Box 1110, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Tel: (855) 23 211 875, Fax: (855) 23 210 358

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Title: Stilled Lives - Photographs from the Cambodian Genocide (127 pages)

Authors: Wynne Cougill, with Pivoine Pang, Chhayan Ra, and Sopheak Sim

Publisher: Documentation Series No. 6, Documentation Center of Cambodia,
P.O. Box 1110, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Tel: (855) 23 211 875, Fax: (855) 23 210 358

2 Comments:

  • Title: Cambodian Buddhism: History and Practice

    Author: Ian Harris

    Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu, Hawaii

    ISBN: 0-8248-2765-1

    *****
    From the cover page flap:

    The study of Cambodian religion has long been hampered by a lack of easily
    accessible scholarship. This impressive new work by Ian Harris thus fills a
    major gap and offers English-language scholars a book-length, up-to-date
    treatment of the religious aspects of Cambodian culture. Beginning with a
    coherent history of the presence of religion in the country from its
    inception to the present day, the book goes on to furnish insights into the
    distinctive nature of Cambodia's important yet overlooked manifestation of
    Theravada Buddhist tradition and shows how it reestablished itself
    following almost total annihilation during the Pol Pot period.

    Historical sections cover the dominant role of tantric Mahayana concepts
    and rituals under the last great king of Angkor, Jayavarman VII (1811- c.
    1220); the rise of Theravada traditions after the collapse of the Angkorian
    civilization; the impact of foreign influences on the development of the
    nineteenth century monastic Buddhism and the Buddhist contribution to an
    emerging sense of Khmer nationhood. The Buddhism practiced in Cambodia has
    much in common with parallel traditions in Thailand and Sri Lanka, yet
    there are also significant differences. The book concentrates on these and
    illustrates how a distinctly Cambodian Theravada developed by accommodating
    itself to premodern Khmer modes of thought. Following the overthrow of
    Price Sihanouk in 1970, Cambodia slid rapidly into disorder and violence.
    Later chapters chart the elimination of institutional Buddhism under the
    Khmer Rouge and its gradual reemergence after Pol Pot, the restoration of
    the monastic order's prerevolutionary institutional forms, and the
    emergence of contemporary Buddhist groupings.

    "Cambodia Buddhism: History and Practice" synthesizes an enormous range of
    scholarship (most of it in French), complemented by the author's own
    fieldwork in modern Cambodia. The result is a wide-ranging,
    well-documented, and comprehensive account of a neglected Southeast Asian
    tradition.

    Ian Harris is reader in Buddhist studies at University College of St.
    Martin, Lancaster, and associate fellow, Becket Institute, St. Hugh's
    College, Oxford.[End]

    By Blogger Proleung, at 10:14 AM  

  • Title: Reconciliation in Cambodia (274 pages)

    Author: Suzannah Linton

    Publisher: Documentation Series No. 5, Documentation Center of Cambodia,
    P.O. Box 1110, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
    Tel: (855) 23 211 875, Fax: (855) 23 210 358

    *****
    From the flaps of the cover:

    "Reconciliation in Cambodia" is a multidisciplinary study of Transitional vJustice in Cambodia, with particular emphasis on reconciliation and the Khmer Rouge. For the first time, Cambodia's struggle to deal with its tragic past is put into global context through an examination of the growing body of literature in this area, and comparisons with the experiences of countries such as Chile, Argentina, Rwanda, South Africa and east Timor. The Heart of the study is the analysis of extensive data collected by DC-Cam's magazine "Searching for the Truth" in the course of a public survey of its Cambodian readers in 2002. This provides unprecedented insight into the attitudes and perceptions of ordinary Cambodians on a range of issues relating to the Khmer Rouge: accountability, revenge, forgiveness, reconciliation, and their vision of the Future.

    Suzannah Linton's international legal career has been in International Justice and the search for accountability for gross violations of human rights, as well as the rebuilding of war-torn nations through Rule of law. She has worked at international tribunals in The Hague and Zurich, the United Nations' international tribunal in East Timor, and on domestic accountability efforts in many countries from the Balkans to Southeast Asia. In Cambodia, she has been a legal consultant to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Documentation center of Cambodia (DC-Cam). In 2002, Ms. Linton was a visiting fellow for Transitional Justice at the the Center for Civil and Human Rights, University of Notre Dame. She publishes regularly on International Law issues. Ms. Linton now advises the Reception, Truth and Reconciliation Commission of East Timor.[End]

    ===================================

    Title: Stilled Lives - Photographs from the Cambodian Genocide (127 pages)

    Authors: Wynne Cougill, with Pivoine Pang, Chhayan Ra, and Sopheak Sim

    Publisher: Documentation Series No. 6, Documentation Center of Cambodia,
    P.O. Box 1110, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
    Tel: (855) 23 211 875, Fax: (855) 23 210 358

    ****
    From the back cover page:

    On April 17, 1975, Khmer Rouge soldiers marched into Phnom Penh. They emptied the cities, killing those who worked for the former regime and forced the rest of the inhabitants into the countryside to labor in the fields. In attempting to turn the country into a classless, agrarian society, the Khmer Rouge eliminated schools, money, markets, the press, the post office, religion, private property, and freedom of movement. Over the next nearly four years, more than a quarter of Cambodia's population perished from starvation, disease, overwork and execution.

    This essay tells the stories of 51 men and women who joined the Khmer Rouge revolution.[End]

    By Blogger Proleung, at 7:53 AM  

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